Archive for category ed parker

Real Karate, Real Freestyle, Putting Aside Fighting

Back in the sixties real karate instructors differed in their opinions towards freestyle. Yes, it was necessary to keep students in the door, but there was freestyle, and there was fighting. Check out the video, my student is really trying to stab me, and I use control instead of fighting to manage him. I’ll tell you about one of the wildest tournaments ever right below that.

My school went to a big tournament in San Francisco.

During one of the matches one of the brown belts jammed his finger, and the second bone on one of his fingers actually came out of the socket and slid over the third bone. The refs looked at it, said he had to go to a hospital and have somebody straighten it out. He wanted to fight, however, so he pulled it out himself and kept fighting.

Interestingly, in spite of this type of die hard enthusiasm, my instructor pulled the entire school out and went home. Well, he didn’t pull them out. He just gathered everybody together and said fighting had little to do with learning how to control an opponent through kumite. He said we were free to remain, and then he left. Everybody followed him.

He was right. Fighting is for people who don’t know the martial arts. A person who knows the martial arts controls his opponent. He predicts him, manipulates him, and does what he will with him.

That’s the difference, of course, between real karate and somebody who likes to fight, and that’s the difference between sport and a real martial art. Check out the variety of different Karate programs at Monster Martial Arts.

Advertisements

, , ,

Leave a comment

I have a confession to make, I used to practice Shotokan Katas while I was going to an Ed Parker Chinese Kenpo Karate style martial arts school.

I kow, heresy, I am impure, oh sob and moan.

But, on my behalf, Kenpo was originally Shotokan. Check out the video, and then I’ll tell you about it.

You didn’t know that Ed Parker Kenpo Karate was originally a shotokan based hard style of Karate? But it’s true! If you look at the first book Ed Parker wrote, it is a sequence of techniques that, when put together, make up the forms of Shotokan.

Mind you, it might not have been Shotokan proper, might even have been Isshin ryu, or shito ryu, or something like that, but the point is made. Chinese Kenpo was originally basic Japanese Okianwan Karate.

Why did it change? Because Parker never got his black belt (Oh, I think he did, but not from Thunderbolt Chow). So he taught a bunch of fellows Karate, ran out of stuff to teach, and started teaching a type of made up Kung Fu.

Look, I know a few dunderheads will get upset with this history, but it’s fairly accurate, there are a slightly different versions out there, but it seems to hold up when you do a little basic net research, and especially when you see that first book.

So, when I say I was doing Shotokan Karate (the Heians out of the Best Karate seriess by Nakayama, while I was studying at an Ed Parker Chinese Kenpo Karate style of martial arts school, that isn’t a bad thing. Heck, if it was good enough for Ed. Right? Check out my site, Monster Martial Arts,  lots of books and courses and things, all the way back to the martial arts taught in the sixties.

, , ,

Leave a comment

Karate Instructor Sees the Light, Teaches the True Art!

Most Karate instructor courses are boot camp, or an accelerated form of ‘monkey see-monkey do,’ or just a bunch of extra forms to learn. Actually, an instructor has to know specialized data, none of which is taught on the instructor courses I’ve seen. Here’s what happened when one fellow saw the data on the Master Instructor Course.

“As I started reading the Instructor Course things that I had been teaching started to become clearer. I could see why you had chosen one move over another in each form. And for the first time I could really explain to my students not only the whys and hows, but how to take the core moves and expand it to fit any situation.

My students have started coming up to me after class telling me how much more they are enjoying it, and that the classes have stopped being so ridged and now flow in a kind of give and take between me and them. I have stopped being a task master and started having fun and letting them teach me as well.

I also now found that I can more easily critique techniques that I see others as well as my own. I can almost feel what is a pure technique that belongs to an art and one that someone just threw in because they thought it looked pretty.”

This is the mark of a good teacher. The ability to see technique or form and know instantly what is right with it, and what is wrong.

Feel free to check out my Master Instructor page. It works not just for a karate instructor, but for any art, because it deals with the true principles of the MartialArts.Pick up a free ebook on the home page while you’re there.

Win #56

, , , ,

Leave a comment

I wrote a blog the other day, I think it’s on the Matrix Martial Arts blog, that talks about world peace, putting down the sword, and I had the most terrible thought afterwards.

The real meaning of Budo, when you go into the root of the hieroglyphics, is to ‘lay down the sword.’ To make peace.

In other words, you learn how to fight in order tolearn how not to fight.

In other words, you have to pick up the sword before you lay down the sword.

And here is the terrible realization:  I have to convince a thousand people to go to war, to create one man to go to peace.

Man! That’s ridiculous!

but that’s how many people start the martial arts, and nevermake it. Actually, the statistic is quite a bit worse than that. But…there it is.

I have to convince people to be warmonging savages just to get one fellow to believe in peace.

Oh, if only we weren’t all warmonging savages tobegin with…then I wouldn’t have to do anything!

Well, having dispensed that bit of cheer, go ahead and drop by Monster Martial Arts, pick up a free book, and learn to (choke) kill.

HanaKwanMass! (Hannakah, Kwanza Christmas!)

, , , ,

Leave a comment

Win #31–A Great Win from a Kenpo Master

It’s interesting to note that most instructor courses are boot camps on toughing it out. As if becoming tougher makes a guy an instructor.

An instructor should have knowledge, and the ability to get that knowledge acorss to the student. If you understand this last sentence, then you understand the spirit in which the Master Instructor course was done.

Data. Pure and simple. Me to you. You to student. That’s all.

The joy is that it is the correct data. Here’s a win from a fellow who studies kenpo.

The benefits of the material in this master instructor course far 
outweigh the price paid. The things that I have gleaned and continue to glean could fill volumes of tomes. I have gained an unshakeable foundation in my art and have begun to bridge all the gaps of knowledge that I had been left with from previous instructors. Where was this information 24 years ago? This course is one of the best things to ever happen to me. 
Thank you Al Case for the gift of knowledge! Be blessed my teacher, Rev. Ernest A. Ross

Man, can’t argue with a win like this. He saw, he used, and the data is him. Any Kenpo student can become a kenpo master by understanding the data on this course. Period.

You can pick up a free Karate book to augment your teaching curriculum at FREE KARATE BOOK!

, , ,

Leave a comment