Black Belt Taekwondo Defined by Kwon Bup

Black Belt Taekwondo Training

When one reaches a Black belt in Taekwondo one has a problem. Interestingly, most people realize this problem even before they reach a black belt in that martial arts. The problem is one of reaching higher levels of martial expertise, or, in other words, getting good at taekwondo sparring.

After all, if one stays in TKD pure, they do get better, but slowly, and this is because they aren’t given any forms that drastically alter their freestyle methods. So one has to search out better forms, better methods, ways to shape the freestyle ability. And, this means often going outside the formalized art.

Now, the problem with training outside the system is that it tends to make everything sloppy. It is hard to find a system that fits together with the TKD method. Using the legs so much, and so uniquely, the art doesn’t mesh with something like savate or muay tai.

The one art that does mesh well is Kwon Bup. We are not speaking of the ancient Kwon Bup, for that has been fairly well lost, and may not even be a good match for modern Taekwondo, anyway. No, we are speaking of the art developed some forty years ago through the Kang Duk Won.

The Kang Duk Won was one of the arts that was used in developing modern taekwondo. It was powerful, used legs well, and reached its highest form when done by a fellow name of Bob Babich in San Jose.

One of the things that Bob did was create several forms to add to the Kang Duk Won. These forms were strong, very straight line, and moved the art from legs into fists, and explored certain concepts of simultaneous block and strike.

The first couple of forms of Kwon Bup are basic, almost karate, and could even replace some of the karate style basics, as they are quick and logical and easier to learn.

The middle three forms are the heart of the matter, however. These are the ones that teach a person how to stay inside and translate from foot to fist.

The last two forms are very interesting, but they tend to move into weapons and a very unique kicking form.

The weapons form is handy, as the distance of a street fight can move from weapons to feet quickly. It’s nice to play with this concept of handling weapons with feet. Though, to be honest, this is not the real intent of the form.

The kicking form, however, is state of the art. It tightens up the Korean kicking styles, pulls the power into the hips, and shows multiple kicks in a VERY realistic manner.

That about sums it up. The Kwon Bup is very handy, and if you do a little googling you might be able to find some info on it, but the data will be scarce. It is not well known, but that’s sometimes the way it is. The best stuff is hard to find.

Anyway, whether you consider it or not, it is a viable concept as far as advancing your black belt taekwondo fighting studies.

pan gai noonThis has been a page about black belt taekwondo training.

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